Our history

Our history

Our history

  • 2019
       

    2019 - 

    On April 1st Hunters changes business structure from a partnership to an LLP.

  • 2015
       

    2015 - 

    Hunters celebrates its Tercentenary. On April 1st Hunters merges with private client firm May, May & Merrimans to create one of the largest private client departments in the country.

  • 2014
       

    2014 - 

    Hunters merges with boutique firm Klein Solicitors.

  • 2011
       

    2011 - 

    In April Hunters merges with private client firm Vernor-Miles and Noble.

  • 2004
       

    2004 - 

    Almost the entire private client department from Lincoln’s Inn firm Dawsons joins Hunters.

  • 2001
       

    2001 - 

    Hunters merges with local firm Alexanders.

  • 1942
       

    1942 - 

    Robert Lewin Hunter dies on 16 May at the age of 90 in Winchester.

  • 1930
       

    1930 - 

    A cricket pavilion known as The Hunter tent is unveiled at Winchester College in honour of the three sons of Robert Lewin Hunter.

  • 1922
       

    1922 - 

    The partnership of Hunter & Haynes – parodied by author HG Wells as ‘Punter & Payne’ of Lincoln’s Inn – is dissolved following the death of Edmund Sidney Pollock Haynes.

  • 1915
       

    1915 - 

    The firm passes its second centenary milestone.

  • 1900
       

    1900 - 

    Edmund Sidney Pollock Haynes, son of Edmund Haynes, is articled to the firm where he would remain for the next 48 years.

  • 1879
       

    1879 - 

    Richard Hunter retires from the partnership after 46 years, replaced as head of the firm by his nephew John. Richard’s second son Robert Lewin Hunter was admitted as a solicitor...

  • 1871
       

    1871 - 

    Edmund Haynes was admitted as a solicitor in March, eventually becoming a Partner in Hunter, Gwatkin & Haynes.

  • 1860
       

    1860 - 

    John Hunter, nephew of Richard, became a Partner in the firm, having been admitted as a solicitor in 1855.

  • 1847
       

    1847 - 

    Ralph Colley Smith dies a bachelor, leaving a huge estate and the contents of 9 New Square. The now well-established firm leads with the name Hunters for the first time.

  • 1839
       

    1839 - 

    John Aldridge dies; his will names partners Ralph Colley Smith and Richard Hunter, of Colley Smith, Hunter and Gwatkin, as executors and trustees.

  • 1834
       

    1834 - 

    Richard Hunter joins the firm at 9 New Square alongside John Aldridge and Ralph Colley Smith, joined in 1835 by Frederick Gwatkin.

  • 1815
       

    1815 - 

    The firm reaches its first centenary milestone.

  • 1806
       

    1806 - 

    Richard Hunter, later to partner Aldridge and Colley Smith at New Square, is born in St Dunstan’s in the East.

  • 1802
       

    1802 - 

    John Aldridge and Ralph Colley Smith are established at 9 New Square, where Hunters is based to this day.

  • 1799
       

    1799 - 

    The practice moves to 7 New Square, Lincoln’s Inn.

  • 1741
       

    1741 - 

    Richard Newton joins his father’s firm.

  • 1715
       

    1715 - 

    The earliest reference in Chancery proceedings to an attorney named Ambrose Newton, who founded his business in Aldermanbury in the City of London.

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