News

Family Mediation Week 2021

  • January 18, 2021
  • By Hunters Law LLP

For Family Mediation Week 2021 Hunters is offering a 25% discount for all new mediation inquiries received from 18 – 22 January.

Mediation can be a good option for people who have separated from their spouse or partner and want to reach agreement on arrangements for their children and/or finances through a constructive and efficient process, without court proceedings.

What is mediation?

Mediation is a process through which separated couples work to reach agreement on issues arising from their separation, assisted by a neutral, professionally trained, mediator. The mediator facilitates discussion to help the parties find a solution which works for both of them. Using specialist family law mediator with experience in the types of issue which you need to resolve means that the mediator will be familiar with the concerns that are likely to arise, can ensure nothing is overlooked, and is able to help you reality-test ideas and can suggest practical steps to help reach agreement.

What are the benefits of mediation?

Mediation can be the quickest, cheapest and least stressful way of resolving issues arising on separation. It is also an empowering process: a solution will not be imposed against your wishes, rather you and your partner are supported in finding a solution which works for you both. The experience of engaging in constructive discussions with a mediator’s assistance can also improve communication between you in the longer term, which is particularly important if you have children and will be co-parenting. Mediation is likely to be more productive than discussing matters directly, as a mediator ensures discussions stay focused, reducing the prospects of argument and increasing the likelihood of making progress.

How does mediation work?

Mediation takes place in meetings between the mediator, you, and your former partner. These sessions tend to last between one and two hours. Meetings can take place at the frequency that the parties choose, and you should generally expect to need 4 to 5 sessions, though this will vary depending on the nature and extent of the issue. Mediators do not give legal advice (though they can provide information about the law), their role is to facilitate discussion. Many people who mediate also instruct a solicitor to provide legal advice to inform their position within the mediation. If agreement is reached, the mediator will draw up a Memorandum of Understanding, which will not become binding until both parties confirm their agreement. Negotiations in mediation are confidential, meaning that if mediation does not succeed, and you have to go to court, the court cannot be told about any proposals made in mediation.

When is mediation suitable?

Mediation works best where both parties are invested in the process and are open to discussion and compromise. Before the process starts, the mediator will have a separate discussion with each party, so they can ask questions about the process and decide whether it is for them, and so that the mediator can assess whether the case is suitable for mediation. Mediation is generally considered unsuitable where there has been domestic abuse or other controlling behaviour.

Can mediation take place remotely?

Yes, mediation is now routinely taking place via video conference calls. Your mediator will make all the necessary arrangements.

What does mediation cost?

Mediators charge an hourly rate which applies for their time in the mediation sessions and any surrounding work. We are offering a 25% discount on our fees for mediation inquiries received during Family Mediation Week, 18 – 22 January. Please contact one of our mediators for more information on 020 7412 0050 or by email: Henry Hood at Henry.Hood@hunterslaw.com, Jo Carr-West at Jo.Carr-West@hunterslaw.com or Jay Patel Jay.Patel@hunterslaw.com.

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